Commander’s Intent (The Tactical Edge, Winter 2008, pp. 52-54)

An effective operational plan focuses the efforts of each individual toward a common objective.  This unity of effort is the most crucial aspect of any tactical operation and the responsibility falls squarely on the senior commander.  Because most tactical operations...

Determining Center of Gravity and Critical Vulnerabilities (The Tactical Edge, Winter 2009, pp. 54-56)

Every tactical operation has some obstacle, factor or influence that is necessary to overcome for success.  It goes without saying then that an ability to reliably identify these factors and influences has momentous implications for planning, especially when...

Bond Relationship Targeting (The Tactical Edge, Summer 2005, p. 82)

One of the most difficult aspects in implementing an asymmetric strategy[1] is identifying a weakness that can be exploited.  A prepared adversary presents few weaknesses and a cunning one guards even those.  One of the most overlooked weaknesses is the relationship...

Operations (3-4) (The Tactical Edge, Winter 2005, pp. 56-57)

While the intelligence and logistical components of a tactical organization are just as crucial, the operations component is far more conspicuous.  This is where the proverbial “rubber meets the road.”  Problems in obtaining timely and reliable intelligence or failing...

Phases of Hostage Recovery Operations (The Tactical Edge, Fall, 2012, pp. 88-89)

Many crises are too complex to be resolved in a single step.  To increase comprehension and reduce risk they must be simplified.  One tried and true method is to conduct the operation in phases.  A phase may be best understood as a stage in an interactive sequence...

Get all 6 Guides and 2 Forms for 1 low price! Order TODAY and they ship out NEXT BUSINESS DAY!

Because each transaction is accompanied with separate handling charges, we can pass on additional savings by bundling them in sets.  This complete set includes all six guides (At the Scene, Battlespace, Fundamental Concepts, Planning, Plans and Staff Functions) and...

TTS Blog – Theoretical Tactical Science

TTS Blog Theoretical Tactical Science While tactical science is an applied science it is based upon doctrine gleaned from centuries of observation and analysis.  This blog is provided for intellectual discussions and research on the theoretical underpinnings of the...

Rules of Engagement (The Tactical Edge, Spring 2003, p. 44)

Effective tactical plans are never contrived in a void.  They must be adapted to meet the needs of all sorts of influences that are always somewhat unique to the particular operational activity, time and place.  Good planners will consider not only what will be...

Command Relationships (The Tactical Edge, Fall, 2011, pp. 82-85)

Every tactical operation is overseen by an organization specifically designed to assign and direct critical personnel and equipment to resolve an unfolding crisis.  Sociologists refer to these organizations as emerging multi-organizational networks (EMONs).[1]  One...

About Field Command

Field Command is a company founded by retired police officers with a desire to pass on the lessons learned from years of practical experience in handling tactical operations and disaster responses.Likewise, they have extensive military backgrounds and are not only experienced but thoroughly grounded in the doctrinal science that supports sound planning and decision making. Using the military metaphor, they all have “muddy boots” from being in the trenches and can personally explain what worked and what didn’t. Even more importantly, however, they can explain why. This single word has become a mantra for explaining the reason such a focus is needed.

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Law enforcement has become a highly specialized and complex function and teaching the multitude of essential skills is both costly and time-consuming. Accordingly, nearly all law enforcement training is focused on what to do and how to do it rather than why it is necessary. While these boilerplate responses will suffice for repetitive situations, they leave decision makers with no other options when they do not understand why something is important (or not). This can easily lead to disaster when a commander applies a solution designed for one set of circumstances but which is woefully inadequate for the current one. As Abraham Maslow noted, “If the only tool you have is a hammer, you have to think of every problem as a nail.”

Incident commanders, planners, and decision makers involved in handling crises of all sorts are far better able to recognize and understand the factors and influences in play if they have first mastered the science that identifies them and explains their significance. Understandably, they are also more capable of adapting and improvising when conditions change. We don’t make any claims on knowing “the” way to do these things but we can tell you a 100 ways on how not to do them. Hence, if you just avoid the things that we know that don’t work you’ll start where we left off!

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