Crisis decision making is best understood as the mental process of reaching a conclusion during a time of instability and danger relevant to resolving the situation.

When tactical operations are disassembled the most conspicuous elements are decisions.  Even novices are quick to notice that the direction and tempo of every action began with a decision.  Decisions are the pivot points in these types of situations and at some point...
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We are committed to preparing the best possible leaders for the worst possible circumstances.

Field Command is a company founded by retired police officers with a desire to pass on the lessons learned from years of practical experience in handling tactical operations and disaster responses. Likewise, they have extensive military backgrounds and are not only...
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OpFor Gaming (The Tactical Edge, Winter 2010, pp. 50-52)

During the First Peloponnesian War nearly 2,500 years ago, Pericles was giving a speech to the Athenians when he stated that “I am more afraid of our own mistakes than our enemies’ designs.”[1]  In truth, most tactical operations and disaster responses fail not...
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We are committed to preparing the best possible leaders for the worst possible circumstances.

Field Command is a company founded by retired police officers with a desire to pass on the lessons learned from years of practical experience in handling tactical operations and disaster responses.Likewise, they have extensive military backgrounds and are not only...
Read More

Anti-terrorism vs. Counter-terrorism (The Tactical Edge, Summer, 2011, pp. 68 70)

As domestic law enforcement assumes more responsibility for protecting communities against acts of terrorism there is much confusion.  At the center of the problem is that there is no universally accepted definition for terrorism itself.  In fact, the fundamental...
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Get the complete set of Field Guides and Forms TODAY!

www.fieldcommandllc.com/product/complete-set/ Field Reference Guides Each of these guides are a compilation of scientific terms and concepts concentrating on a single subject.  The terms and concepts are also grouped by topic in the way they interact with one...
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Information vs. Intelligence (The Tactical Edge, Fall 1994, p. 77) Police Strategy and Tactics

Two terms, often used interchangeably, but with distinct meanings in tactical situations are “information” and “intelligence.”  Information is described as the knowledge or news of an event or situation gained through collection of facts or data.  Intelligence, on the...
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Order your Field Guides TODAY, and they will ship out NEXT BUSINESS DAY!

Because each transaction is accompanied with separate handling charges, we can pass on additional savings by bundling them in sets.  This complete set includes all six guides (At the Scene, Battlespace, Fundamental Concepts, Planning, Plans and Staff Functions) and...
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Expressed and Implied Threats by Charles “Sid” Heal (The Tactical Edge, Spring 1996, p. 71) SWAT Training

All tactical operations involving adversaries are resolved through some application of force.  Since ancient times, mankind has attempted to increase the amount of force which can be applied to achieve victory.  The first weapons were probably rocks.  These could be...
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Intelligence (2-4) (The Tactical Edge, Fall 2004, pp. 72-74)

In the darkest hours of World War II, Winston Churchill wrote a note to General John Dill, stating, “The great thing is to get the true picture, whatever it is.”[1]  The picture Churchill considered so important is called the “intelligence picture” and refers to a...
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About Field Command

Field Command is a company founded by retired police officers with a desire to pass on the lessons learned from years of practical experience in handling tactical operations and disaster responses.Likewise, they have extensive military backgrounds and are not only experienced but thoroughly grounded in the doctrinal science that supports sound planning and decision making. Using the military metaphor, they all have “muddy boots” from being in the trenches and can personally explain what worked and what didn’t. Even more importantly, however, they can explain why. This single word has become a mantra for explaining the reason such a focus is needed.

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Law enforcement has become a highly specialized and complex function and teaching the multitude of essential skills is both costly and time-consuming. Accordingly, nearly all law enforcement training is focused on what to do and how to do it rather than why it is necessary. While these boilerplate responses will suffice for repetitive situations, they leave decision makers with no other options when they do not understand why something is important (or not). This can easily lead to disaster when a commander applies a solution designed for one set of circumstances but which is woefully inadequate for the current one. As Abraham Maslow noted, “If the only tool you have is a hammer, you have to think of every problem as a nail.”

Incident commanders, planners, and decision makers involved in handling crises of all sorts are far better able to recognize and understand the factors and influences in play if they have first mastered the science that identifies them and explains their significance. Understandably, they are also more capable of adapting and improvising when conditions change. We don’t make any claims on knowing “the” way to do these things but we can tell you a 100 ways on how not to do them. Hence, if you just avoid the things that we know that don’t work you’ll start where we left off!

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